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Modeling Bass Diffusion with Rivalry

February 18th, 2010 4 comments

This is the last of a three-part series on the Limits to Growth Archetype.  The first part can be accessed here and the second part here.

Last time, we explored the effects of Type 1 rivalry (rivalry between different companies in a developing market) on the Bass diffusion model by replicating the model structure.  This part will generalize this structure and add Type 2 rivalry (customers switching between brands).

Bass Diffusion with Type 1 Rivalry

To model the general case of an emerging market with multiple competitors, we can return to the original single company case and use arrays to add additional companies.  In this case, everything except Potential Customers needs to be arrayed, as shown below (and available by clicking here).

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For this example, three companies will be competing for the pool of Potential Customers.  Each array has one-dimension, named Company, and that dimension has three elements, named A, B, and C, one for each company.  Although each different parameter, wom multiplier, fraction gained per $K, and marketing spend in $K, can be separately specified for each company, all three companies use the same values initially.  All three companies, however, do not enter the market at the same time.  Company A enters the market at the start of the simulation, company B enters six months later, and company C enters six months after that.

Recall that the marketing spend is the trigger for a company to start gaining customers.  Thus, the staggered market entrance can be modeled with the following equation for marketing spend in $K:

STEP(10, STARTTIME + (ARRAYIDX() – 1)*6)

The STEP function is used to start the marketing spend for each company at the desired time.  The ARRAYIDX function returns the integer index of the array element, so it will be 1 for company A, 2 for company B, and 3 for company C.  Thus, the offsets from the start of the simulation for the launch of each company’s marketing campaign are 0, 6, and 12, respectively.

This leads to the following behavior:

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Note that under these circumstances, the first company to enter the market retains a leadership position.  However, companies B and C could anticipate this and market more strongly.  What if company B spent 50% more and company C spent 100% more than company A on marketing that is similarly effective?  This could be modeling by once again changing the equation for marketing spend in $K, this time to:

STEP(10 + (ARRAYIDX() – 1)*5, STARTTIME + (ARRAYIDX() – 1)*6)

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Developing a Market Using the Bass Diffusion Model

January 21st, 2010 2 comments

This is part two of a three part series on Limits to Growth.  Part one can be accessed here and part three can be accessed here.

In part one of this series, I explained the Limits to Growth archetype and gave examples in epidemiology and ecology. This part introduces the Bass diffusion model, an effective way to implement the capture of customers in a developing market. This is also used to implement what Kim Warren calls Type 1 rivalry in his book Strategy Management Dynamics, that is, rivalry between multiple companies in an emerging market.

The Bass Diffusion Model

The Bass diffusion model is very similar to the SIR model shown in part one. Since we do not usually track customers who have “recovered” from using our product, the model only has two stocks, corresponding loosely to the Susceptible and Infected stocks. New customers are acquired through contact with existing customers, just as an infection spreads, but in this context this is called word of mouth (wom). This is, however, not sufficient to spread the news of a good product, so the Bass diffusion model also includes a constant rate of customer acquisition through advertising. This is shown below (and can be downloaded by clicking here).

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The feedback loops B1 and R are the same as the balancing and reinforcing loops between Susceptible and Infected in the SIR model. Instead of an infection rate, there is a wom multiplier which is the product of the Bass diffusion model’s contact rate and the adoption rate. If you are examining policies related to these variables, it would be important to separate them out in the model.

The additional feedback loop, B2, starts the ball rolling and helps a steady stream of customers come in the door. If you examine the SIR model closely, you will see that the initial value of Infected is one. If no one is infected, the disease cannot spread. Likewise, if no one is a customer, there is no one to tell others how great the product is so they want to become customers also. By advertising, awareness of the product is created in the market and some people will become customers without having encountered other customers who are happy with the product.

The behavior of this model is shown below. Note it is not different in character from the SIR model or the simple population model.

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